5 February 2009 - 6:35pmMore Subversion

A few months back I posted briefly about how I set up a Subversion server on an Ubuntu virtual machine.  That virtual machine was set up using Virtual Box which I’ve since decided is sort of a pain to use.  As a result, I uninstalled Virtual Box and removed all of the VMs created under it (losing the Subversion server in the process).

For COMM 444 I had to create a Fedora VM for “learning” on.  I decided to give VMWare Server a try and have been mostly impressed with the quality of it.  Setting up a Fedora installation was pretty painless and it runs so well on my machine that I’ve been using it to do schoolwork and such on (as opposed to using polaris, which has some annoyances).  Today in class, Tino mentioned that if we were responsible developers we would probably be using some sort of version control system while we write our compiler.  That way, when we finish building a piece of it and get it all working, we’ll always have the code at that particular moment so that next week when we break it beyond repair (or accidentally delete everything) we can go back to the way it was.

So I took his advice and spent some time after class getting a Subversion server set up in the Fedora VM I already have set up.  To get it going, I used this article on the COSI wiki and this post on my blog (which references a few other articles).  I should note that using the version of WebSVN from their site (as opposed to the one available in the Ubuntu repository) means that the sweet theme I worked so hard to find last time I set this up is included as the default.

There is still one fairly obvious issue and that’s the fact that, though I’m committing all my changes to SVN, they’re not really being backed up to some other location.  Both my working copy and the SVN revisioned one are on the same hard drive.  That means that if my computer bites the dust, I’ve still lost everything I worked on.  I’ll be trying to figure out some form of backups soon, but until then at least I have revisioning under control.

1 Comment | Categories: COSI, Technology

Comments:

  1. I was wondering if that wasn’t the better way to go. I’m glad you decided to give it a try. Good luck on the back up, sounds challenging.

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